What is stroke?

 

 

​​A stroke is a “brain attack”. It can happen to anyone at any time. It occurs when blood flow to an area of the brain is cut off. When this happens, brain cells are deprived of oxygen and begin to die.When brain cells die during a stroke, body and brain functions controlled by that area of the brain– such as memory and muscle control– can be lost, sometimes temporarily, and sometimes permanently.

  • Each year nearly 800,000 people expierence a new or recurrent stroke.
  • A stroke happens every 40 seconds
  • Stroke is the 5th leading cause of death in the U.S.
  • Up to 80 percent strokes are prevented
  • Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability in theU.S.

There are three types of strokes: ishemic stokes, hemorrhagic strokes, and transient strokes.

Ishemic Stroke 

Ishemic stroke is the most common form of stroke, accounting for about 85% of strokes. This type of stroke is caused by blockages and narrowing of the arteries in the brain. These blockages are often caused by blood clots.

Hemmorrhagic Stroke 

Hemmorrhagic stroke are caused by ateries in the brain either leaking blood or bursting open. The leaked blood puts pressure on brain cells and damages them.

Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) 

TIA’s are different from the aforementioned kinds of stroke because the flow of blood to the brain is only briefly interrupted. TIA are similar to ischemic stroke in that they are often caused by blood clots or other debris.

A stroke can lead to long-term problems, depending how quickly it is diagnosed and treated. The patient can experience temporary or permanent disabilities in the aftermath of a stroke. The effects of a a stroke can be also be life changing both physically and emotionaly. 

After a stroke you may have a period of time where you may have to rehabilitate. There are many devices that could help you live independantly during this time.

  • Bedrails are good for assisting patients to get out of bed and keeping them from falling out of bed.
  • Grab bars if a person has good upper strength can hold onto the grab bar while moving or standing to provide more support to the body.
  • Shower chairs a patients can sit on during a shower to have better balance.
  • Raise toilet seats help reduce the distance from standing to sitting.
  • Leg strap, dressing stick, sock aides, and grip utensils are also a great aide for indepence.

May is Stroke Awareness month you can log into www.strokassociated.org to get more information on how to help prevent a stroke.​​

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